How to Use Ping Command Parameters in CMD on Windows 10

Ping Parameters has basic usage of the ping command as well as more advanced usage parameters. Ping is the most common program used to troubleshoot network connectivity problems.

How to Use Ping Command Parameters in CMD on Windows 10

How to Use Ping Parameters in CMD

With these parameters, you can more thoroughly examine and solve problems that occur on a network. You can easily test the network connection by pinging your ADSL or Router’s LAN or WAN interfaces. And it sends packets of 32 bytes by default.

On Windows operating systems, you can ping an IP address or an Internet website (domain name) by opening the CMD command prompt. Using the ping command, you can ping the target host continuously or the number of times you specify through a host. When you ping an address, the default Ping number is 4.

Using Ping parameters, you can Ping to an address and gain testing experiences.

How to Use Ping on CMD

To open the CMD command prompt on the Windows operating system, press the Windows Key + R and open the Run window. Type CMD in the Run window and click the Open button.

After opening the CMD prompt, type the ping /command and press Enter. As you can see in the output below, you can see that there are quite a few parameters.

Options include Usage and Options.

Usage: Explain the use of parameters.
Options: Explains the existing parameters.

C:\>ping /?

Usage: ping [-t] [-a] [-n count] [-l size] [-f] [-i TTL] [-v TOS]
            [-r count] [-s count] [[-j host-list] | [-k host-list]]
            [-w timeout] [-R] [-S srcaddr] [-c compartment] [-p]
            [-4] [-6] target_name

Options:
    -t             Ping the specified host until stopped.
                   To see statistics and continue - type Control-Break;
                   To stop - type Control-C.
    -a             Resolve addresses to hostnames.
    -n count       Number of echo requests to send.
    -l size        Send buffer size.
    -f             Set Don't Fragment flag in packet (IPv4-only).
    -i TTL         Time To Live.
    -v TOS         Type Of Service (IPv4-only. This setting has been deprecated
                   and has no effect on the type of service field in the IP
                   Header).
    -r count       Record route for count hops (IPv4-only).
    -s count       Timestamp for count hops (IPv4-only).
    -j host-list   Loose source route along host-list (IPv4-only).
    -k host-list   Strict source route along host-list (IPv4-only).
    -w timeout     Timeout in milliseconds to wait for each reply.
    -R             Use routing header to test reverse route also (IPv6-only).
                   Per RFC 5095 the use of this routing header has been
                   deprecated. Some systems may drop echo requests if
                   this header is used.
    -S srcaddr     Source address to use.
    -c compartment Routing compartment identifier.
    -p             Ping a Hyper-V Network Virtualization provider address.
    -4             Force using IPv4.
    -6             Force using IPv6.

C:\>

 
   Step 1 | Ping -t Command

It continuously pings a specific IP address or Web site. And this process continues until it stops. You must press Ctrl + C to stop/end the continuous ping command.

C:\>ping -t 8.8.8.8

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=36ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=35ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=57

Ping statistics for 8.8.8.8:
    Packets: Sent = 10, Received = 10, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 32ms, Maximum = 36ms, Average = 33ms
Control-C
^C
C:\>

 

   Step 2 | Ping -a Command

This command displays the computer name of the computer with the IP address you are pinging. Ping the Google DNS server as in the following output and observe that the computer/server name is google-public-dns-a.google.com.

C:\>ping -a 8.8.8.8

Pinging google-public-dns-a.google.com [8.8.8.8] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=35ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=34ms TTL=57

Ping statistics for 8.8.8.8:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 32ms, Maximum = 35ms, Average = 33ms

C:\>

 
   Step 3 | Ping -n Command

This command assigns a specified number of Ping to an IP address and Web site. Its value is 4 by default. You can ping the number of times you specify by adding -n to the ping command. Linux and macOS systems do not have ping counts. If you want to ping the specified number of times to an IP address or Web site on macOS and Linux, you must use the ping -n + number command.

If you’re wondering how to ping on Linux and macOS, watch our Linux Ping and MacOS Ping Usage videos.

The following Ping -n command output indicates that the connection to the Google DNS server test 3 times.

C:\>ping -n 3 8.8.8.8

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=34ms TTL=57

Ping statistics for 8.8.8.8:
    Packets: Sent = 3, Received = 3, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 33ms, Maximum = 34ms, Average = 33ms

C:\>

 
   Step 4 | Ping -l Command

When you normally ping to a destination, the packet size sent is 32 Bytes. You can increase this value with ping -l command. The ping packet size limit is 65,500 bytes.

C:\>ping -l 2345 8.8.8.8

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 2345 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=2345 time=68ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=2345 time=65ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=2345 time=62ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=2345 time=62ms TTL=57

Ping statistics for 8.8.8.8:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 62ms, Maximum = 68ms, Average = 64ms

C:\>

 
   Step 5 | Ping -l flood Command

This command sends the packet size you specify without destroying the destination. In short, it adds the Don’t Fragment Flag 1 bit to the IP header in the Echo Request packet, allowing packets send without fragmentation.

This parameter can be used to resolve the Path Maximum Transmission Unit (PMTU) problems. When the echo-request packet tries to pass through the routers, the packet does not fragment.

C:\>ping -l 1500 -f 8.8.8.8

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 1500 bytes of data:
Packet needs to be fragmented but DF set.
Packet needs to be fragmented but DF set.
Packet needs to be fragmented but DF set.
Packet needs to be fragmented but DF set.

Ping statistics for 8.8.8.8:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\>ping -l 1234 -f 8.8.8.8

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 1234 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=1234 time=48ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=1234 time=53ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=1234 time=49ms TTL=57
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=1234 time=48ms TTL=57

Ping statistics for 8.8.8.8:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 48ms, Maximum = 53ms, Average = 49ms

C:\>

 
   Step 6 | Ping -i TTL Command

This command adds the TTL value to the packet sent to the destination. The default TTL value is 255 and may vary between devices. When you set the TTL value to a value lower than the previously received value, the packet will never be reached to the destination address and will display the message TTL Expired in Transit.

C:\>ping www.google.com

Pinging www.google.com [172.217.17.196] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 172.217.17.196: bytes=32 time=44ms TTL=54
Reply from 172.217.17.196: bytes=32 time=38ms TTL=54
Reply from 172.217.17.196: bytes=32 time=40ms TTL=54
Reply from 172.217.17.196: bytes=32 time=44ms TTL=54

Ping statistics for 172.217.17.196:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 38ms, Maximum = 44ms, Average = 41ms

C:\>ping -i 9 www.google.com

Pinging www.google.com [172.217.17.196] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 209.85.143.115: TTL expired in transit.
Reply from 209.85.143.115: TTL expired in transit.
Reply from 209.85.143.115: TTL expired in transit.
Reply from 209.85.143.115: TTL expired in transit.

Ping statistics for 172.217.17.196:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

C:\>

 
   Step 7 | Ping -v TOS Command

This command sets the Type of Service in the IP header of the Echo-Request packet to be sent to the destination. The Type of Service value is 0 by default and can change from 0 to 255.

   Step 8 | Ping -r Command

This command records the paths for the “Echo Reply” package received for the “Echo Request” package. The minimum value is 1 and the maximum value is 9.

C:\>ping -r 2 vmware.com

Pinging vmware.com [45.60.11.183] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=165ms TTL=53
    Route: 85.101.110.75 ->
           85.101.104.1
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=167ms TTL=53
    Route: 85.101.110.75 ->
           85.101.104.1
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=168ms TTL=53
    Route: 85.101.110.75 ->
           85.101.104.1
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=166ms TTL=53
    Route: 85.101.110.75 ->
           85.101.104.1

Ping statistics for 45.60.11.183:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 165ms, Maximum = 168ms, Average = 166ms

C:\>

 
   Step 9 | Ping -s Command

Changes the Timestamp value in the IP address header and specifies the Hop Count time value. Records time information for outgoing and incoming Echo packets. The default value for this parameter is 1, and the maximum value is 9.

C:\>ping -s 3 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
    Timestamp: 192.168.1.1 : 14619372 ->
               192.168.1.1 : 14619372 ->
               192.168.1.250 : 14621765
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
    Timestamp: 192.168.1.1 : 14620404 ->
               192.168.1.1 : 14620404 ->
               192.168.1.250 : 14622796
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
    Timestamp: 192.168.1.1 : 14621449 ->
               192.168.1.1 : 14621449 ->
               192.168.1.250 : 14623841
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
    Timestamp: 192.168.1.1 : 14622469 ->
               192.168.1.1 : 14622469 ->
               192.168.1.250 : 14624860

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 1ms, Maximum = 2ms, Average = 1ms

C:\>

 
   Step 10 | Ping -j Host-List Command

Uses Loose Source Routing to set the set of Routers that a package should visit. The next Router address is configured for the first destination of the sending packet. The path of the ping packet is configured with the Host-List and the maximum number of IP addresses of the Host-List is 9.

   Step 11 | Ping -k Host-List Command

This command uses the Strict Source Route option in the IP header. The next Router or Interface for the Strict Source Route must be active. The maximum number of Host-List IP addresses is 9. The Host List consists of IP numbers that are listed one after the other.

   Step 12 | Ping -w Timeout Command

Specifies the wait time for Echo Reply for Echo Request packets to be sent. The time zone is evaluated in milliseconds, and the default value is 4,000ms (4 seconds).

When you ping -w 8000 192.168.2.1 on a computer outside your IP block, the Request Timed Out message will be displayed every 8 seconds.

C:\>ping -w 8000 192.168.2.1

Pinging 192.168.2.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.2.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\>

 
   Step 13 | Ping -r Command

This command is only used in the IPv6 structure and follows the outgoing/incoming paths.

   Step 14 | Ping -S srcaddr Command

This command is used to specify the source address.

C:\>ping -S 192.168.1.250 vmware.com

Pinging vmware.com [45.60.11.183] from 192.168.1.250 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=146ms TTL=54
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=146ms TTL=54
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=145ms TTL=54
Reply from 45.60.11.183: bytes=32 time=148ms TTL=54

Ping statistics for 45.60.11.183:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 145ms, Maximum = 148ms, Average = 146ms

C:\>

 
   Step 15 | Ping -4 Command

This command forces IPv4 to ping.

   Step 16 | Ping -6 Command

This command forces IPv6 to ping.

Detailed Network Connection Testing ⇒ Video

To better understand the use of these parameters, you can watch the video below and also subscribe to our YouTube channel to support us.

   Final Word


In this article, we have examined the use of Ping parameters to troubleshoot network problems in more detail. Thanks for following us!

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3 Comments

  1. Avatar for ilana ilana January 2, 2019

    Is there interval that user can control / change
    I mean interval time between previous and the next ping messages?
    I mean I wish that every ping packet will be sent with interval of 3Sec from the previous ping packet
    In Linux there option – i that is an interval time
    In Win – does such exist ?

    Reply
    • Avatar for tolqabaqci tolqabaqci January 2, 2019

      Hello there.

      You want to ping every 3 seconds, right? I’ve never done this before, but I did some research and found the most appropriate program to do it.

      You can do this with the Ping Tester program. I’ve even downloaded this program and it works smoothly and nicely.

      Reply
    • Avatar for tolqabaqci tolqabaqci January 2, 2019

      Also, download the “PsPing” software from Microsoft and run the CMD in the PsPing folder. Then, use the “psping -i 3 destination” command.

      Example: psping -i 3 google.com

      Reply

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